28 Mistakes Startups Make When Pitching To Investors


Richard Harroch (Managing Director of VantagePoint Capital Partners) recently wrote in the article below about common mistakes that entrepreneurs make in pitching VCs and other investors.

There are 28 mistakes summarized by Harroch in the full article. Here are the top 23 mistakes listed:

  1. Sending an executive summary or business plan unsolicited

Pitching a VC who is not interested in the startup's space

  1. Giving a VC a 50-page business plan to review

  2. Not defining why the market opportunity is big

  3. Coming in with your team to a pitch meeting, but only have the CEO speak

  4. Saying that you don’t have any competition

  5. Having uninteresting or unrealistic financial projections

  6. Asking a VC to sign an NDA before you will share information

  7. Giving me confusing or bad answers to an investor's questions

Not describing to a VC what problem your business solve

  1. Presenting unrealistic valuation expectations for your startup

  2. Using clichés

  3. Having more than 20 slides in your investor presentation

  4. Forgetting to highlight your team’s experience and credentials

  5. Not paying attention to detail in the investor presentation

  6. Not doing a demo

  7. Not doing research and due dligence on the VC

  8. Not looking at other pitch decks and executive summaries

  9. Not understanding customer acquisition costs (CAC) and long-term value (LTV) of the customer

  10. Not understanding the potential business risks

  11. Not articulating the key assumptions in your financial projections

  12. Not articulating your product or technology differentiation

  13. Not having a detailed marketing strategy

Click here to read the full article:

http://www.forbes.com/sites/allbusiness/2014/08/20/28-common-mistakes-startups-make-when-pitching-to-inve(stors/

#entrepreneurship #venturecapital #seedcapital #seriesa #fundraising

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