CFOs and CEOs Turn Pessimistic Q4 2015 - Wall Street Journal CFO Blog


The Wall Street Journal CFO blog summarized a recent survey from the American Institute of CPAs (AICPA). The AICPA surveyed 852 executives that included CFOs, CEOs, controllers and others from public and private companies.

Here are some key findings from the survey:

  • Only 45% of CFOs and CEOs surveyed by the accounting association said they were optimistic about the U.S. economy

  • This represents a decline from 64% in the Q4 2014 and 68% in Q1 2015.

  • Rising labor costs were cited by nearly 40% of respondents as a key risk. Executives are likely “concerned with the ability to hire talent as well as the cost of that talent.”

  • The cost of raw materials was cited as a next-biggest risk factor in for 2016, followed by interest rates and energy costs.

  • Sales and profit growth expectations are decreasing. CFOs and CEOs said they expect revenue and profit increases of just 2.9% and 2%, respectively, over the next 12 to 18 months.

  • 57% plan to expand, down from 60% in Q3 2015.

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